EDWARD V11 A cross between Blenheim Orange and Golden Noble, dating from about 1902. Raised by Barbourne Nurseries and introduced by Messrs Rowe of Worcester around 1908. Once one of the most popular cooking apples. Large, fairly juicy fruit which has been said to cook to a dark purée, but we find it cooks slowly and keeps most of its shape. It has a rich, slightly acid flavour, but does not reach the quality of the best cooking apples. Neat upright growth with rich pink blossom. Late flowering and stores well.

Pollination Group 7

 
 
 
 
 

 

 

EGGLETON STYRE Hogg records that this medium sized cider apple was raised from seed by Mr William Hill of Lower Eggleton, Ledbury, Herefordshire, and first fruited around 1847. It made good cider if used alone, without blended juice. It was sweet and rich with a high red colour. He says “this apple is second early, and is so sweet and aromatic, as to be very attractive to hares, rabbits, fowls, blackbirds and fieldfares, who will choose it in preference to all others.” It was also grown in Somerset. It was last recorded at the Apple and Pear Conference of 1934 and seemed lost to Britain. We discovered it in the Grove Collection, in Tasmania, and they sent scions in 2005. It is also a pleasant enough eating apple. Pollination Group 5

 

 

EGREMONT RUSSET Known since 1872, though its previous history has been lost. It may have been raised on Lord Egremont's estate at Petworth, in Sussex. Medium sized, apples with russet, sometimes complete, over green skin and sometimes with some broken red showing. Often picked under-ripe for the shops, it is much better grown in private gardens. The flesh has a sweet, nutty taste which becomes richer on storage. It keeps until December, though the fruit becomes softer with age.

Pollination Group 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELDON PIPPIN An English cider “sweet” and dessert apple. It was raised in Lower Eggleton near Ledbury, Herefordshire, by Mr William Hill. First recorded in 1842 (though Hogg says it first fruited in 1847) it was in existence in 1884, though there have been no reports of it since. Rediscovered by us at Grove Research Station, Tasmania it came back to Britain in 2005. It is medium sized, intermediate rectangular and convex, with prominent ribs at the eye. The skin is yellow, flushed and streaked orange/red. Flesh is yellowish, sweet, juicy and richly aromatic; “a very excellent dessert apple” according to Hogg. Ripe in October but best in Nov-Dec, keeping to April. **

Pollination Group 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELIZA OF FRINGFORD One of three old apples growing in a small orchard at the Old Rectory, built in 1680, in the pretty village of Fringford, Oxfordshire. Brought to our attention by the owner, Charles Hebditch, none of these apples appear to be varieties currently known. Fringford owes some celebrity to it being the fictional ‘Candleford Green’ created by Flora Thompson in ‘Lark Rise to Candleford’. She lived at Fringford and worked in the post office there, in her early adulthood. This now-small old hollow tree bears small to medium sized pale yellow flattened rounded apples which ripen in late August and will not keep into November without losing condition and flavour, but for a few weeks they are quite excellent. The flesh is very crisp but fine, very juicy, sweet and tangy, with a good flavour hinting at Parma Violets. Very good for an early apple.

Pollination Group 3


 
             

 

ELLISON’S ORANGE A middle season eating apple, dating back to 1904, and raised by Rev. Ellison of Bracebridge and Mr Wipf, head gardener to Rev. Ellison's brother in law at Hartsholme Hall, in Lincolnshire. Rev. Ellison was a renowned pomologist and fruit grower early in the 20th century, with over 1500 fruit trees. Crisp, juicy fruit with a rich, almost aniseed, flavour. A cross between Cox’s Orange Pippin and Calville Blanche D’Hiver. Good crops, though sometimes biennial. Trees fruit when quite young. Free spurring.

Pollination Group 4

 

 

 

ELMHAM MILL A very old variety, by its appearance, but one for which the original name cannot now be determined. It was brought to us by Adrian Cadman of Elmham Mill, a redeveloped property on the River Wensum at Worthing, Dereham, Norfolk. The large, old decrepit tree stands alone close to the bank of the river and in an unlikely planting spot for an early 18th century mill, but an even more unlikely spot after the mill closed. A very late season apple of pale green, washed with brown in the sun, and prominent spots. Scaly russet extends from the eye and stalk over the body like a weathered face. The eye is very unusual offering a view deep into the apple. By November it is ready to be cooked to give a sharp, rich purée. An apple that shouts antiquity.

 

ELMORE PIPPIN A very late dessert apple from Elmore, in Gloucestershire, known since the 1920s but older. It is probably not fully ripe until December. Round, sometimes slightly conical fruit, medium sized, with green skin, sometimes flushed brown and with prominent pale lenticels all over. Crisp, sometimes hard, only slightly sweet and rather acidic, when it might be used as a cider sharp. Later, it becomes sweeter and rich, for dessert.

Pollination Group 5

 

 

 

 

 
             

 

EMNETH EARLY Syn. Early Victoria. A codlin-type cooking apple, often said to be the best early one, and sometimes ready in July. Raised by William Lynn of Emneth, in Cambridgeshire, as a hybrid of Keswick Codlin and Lord Grosvenor. It becomes very frothy when fully cooked, and needs almost no sugar. The trees are hardy, upright and compact, though they tend to be biennial, and it is best to thin the crop to avoid small fruit and discourage biennial fruiting. Much esteemed in Poland for its ruggedness. Free spurring. Keeps until November.

Pollination Group 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGLISH CODLIN Codlin is the old name for a class of cooking apple; to coddle is to cook gently, so Codlins need little cooking to become soft and tender. The English Codlin is one of the oldest English apples, once widely grown throughout the country. It is a large early cooking apple, with the characteristic codlin shape and white, juicy flesh which is soft, fluffy and delicately perfumed when cooked. It can be used from August until October, though its use can be extended. Parson Woodforde in his diaries of 1774 said that he had given a dinner at New College, Oxford, which included a Codlin Tart, with cream, on July 27th.

Pollination Group 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENGLISH GREENING An old American late apple with a strong English connection, from the third oldest living ‘provenanced’ apple tree in the world, after the original Bramley and Milton Wonder, (see later). The tree was known to have been planted in 1826 at Fort Vancouver, Washington State. It was planted as ‘English Greening’. After some research and valuable assistance from Ryan Durocher, Urban Forestry Co-ordinator at the City of Vancouver, who also kindly sent us scionwood, the history of the tree is as follows: An English lady at a farewell dinner, for Emilius Simpson, cousin of Hudson's Bay Governor, Sir George Simpson, gave him the seeds from her dessert apple and asked him to plant them at the fort. Dr. John McLoughlin planted five apple seeds, and the ‘Old Apple Tree’ is the only remaining tree that grew from those seeds. Every year, a festival is held to celebrate the tree on the first Saturday in October at the historic Apple Tree Park, 112 Columbia Way, Vancouver. Medium sized apples, longer than wide, oval to truncate conic, ribbed and knobbed around the eye. The skin is pale green, turning yellow with a warm blush in the sun, with some netted russet. An apple that remains hard until late in the season. It stores well. Sharp, but rich flavour. Very attractive blossom. **

Pollination Group 2