DUCK’S BILL An old Sussex apple sent to the National Fruit Trials in 1937 by Mr Fred Streeter, head gardener at Petworth House in West Sussex. It may be the ancient Sussex Duck’s Bill, though this name has long been assumed a synonym of Winter Pearmain, probably in error. Middle to late in season, it is a large, tall and often conical apple with pronounced ribs. The body is pale green/yellow, flushed with orange, scarlet and carmine stripes, with russet dots. The flesh is crisp, rich and lemony when raw, and when cooked it keeps its shape and needs little sugar. It keeps to December.

Pollination Group 6

 
 
 
 
 

 

 

DUKE OF CLARENCE A top quality apple which we have assumed to be of English origin, though it has only been known in the Grove Collection in Tasmania, who kindly sent us scions in 2012. Many English apples found their way to the colonies in the company of settlers, keen to provide for themselves and we found some very important ‘lost’ apples in the Grove Heritage Collection. This apple might well have been named after the same Duke of Clarence who was renowned for having drowned in a butt of Malmsey wine. It is a very colourful late ripening variety that must be left on the tree into November, for its fullest flavour. The flesh is crisp, juicy and very sweet and rich. The apples keep over the winter.

 

DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE Also called Allspice. A late dessert apple raised by Mr Wilson, the Duke of Devonshire's head gardener at Holker Hall, Lancashire, in 1835. The medium sized fruit has an attractive golden skin and russeting. A good, crisp eating apple when straight from the tree, but can be left to mature until Christmas or later when the fruit has a warm, rich flavour, though the crispness is then gone. It reached its peak of popularity in the early 20th century. Stores until March.

Pollination Group 4

 

 

 

 

 

DUMELOW'S SEEDLING Syn Wellington. Raised in the late 18th century by Richard Dumelow, a farmer from Shakerstone, Leics, and eventually exhibited at the R.H.S. shows in 1818 as Dumelow's Seedling. It was possibly bred from Northern Greening. It was subsequently renamed Wellington, now reverting to its prior name. Rich, crisp, cream flesh, which cooks to a strongly flavoured purée, similar to a Bramley but creamier in texture. Once grown especially for the mincemeat trade, and also excellent when baked. It was said to be Queen Victoria's favourite apple and was used as a May Day apple in the North because it stores very well. Spreading trees, with good blossom. Free spur bearing.

Pollination Group 5

 

DUNN’S SEEDLING An Australian apple that first arrived in Britain in 1890. It was said to have been raised at Kew near Melbourne by Mr Condor and introduced by Mr Munroe. A medium sized late dessert apple, ripe in October and storing to February. It can sometimes be large. The pale yellow apples sometimes have a pink flush. The flesh is crisp and white with a sweet subacid flavour.

Pollination Group 4

 

 
             

 

DUTCH MIGNONNE Introduced to England by Thomas Harvey of Catton, near Norwich, around 1771. He obtained his scion wood from Holland, and as the name of the apple was not known he called it ‘Dutch Mignonne’. It is sometimes said to have been of German origin, and Lindley said it was popular all over Europe. A late-season, dual-purpose apple, with medium-sized fruit, roundish in shape but lightly ribbed around the eye. The skin is greenish-yellow, streaked and blushed light red and speckled with russet dots, especially around the eye. The flesh is crisp, very juicy, sweet and aromatic, with a rich flavour. The tree is free-spurring, so is good for training as an espalier or cordon. Heavy crops, which keep until March.

Pollination Group 3

 

DYMOCK RED From Dymock village, in Gloucestershire. A very old and striking apple mentioned by John Evelyn in 1670. Though generally considered a cider bittersweet, it is also eaten as a sweet dessert apple, with relish, when fully ripe, and with very little tannin. The flesh is very white and a little dryish. The shape is irregular, sometimes conical, sometimes flattened. Medium sized, with dark stripes, sometimes covering the whole apple.

Pollination Group 3

 

 

 

EASTER ORANGE Raised by Hilliers of Winchester, Hampshire and introduced in 1897. A sweet, aromatic dessert apple with a golden skin, heavily streaked with red. Medium sized fruits, with cream flesh. Called Easter Orange because the fruit stores well until March. Good when first ripe but a delicious apple when patiently stored.

Pollination Group 4

 

 

 

 

 

 
             

 

ECKLINVILLE An Irish apple raised by a gardener named Logan, before 1800, at Ecklinville, near Belfast. A popular cooking apple in Ireland and southern Scotland throughout the 19th century and also often grown in Worcestershire and other southern counties. The fruit is large with skin of bright lemon yellow, sometimes with a warm blush, and the tender flesh breaks down completely when cooked, making a fine sharp apple sauce. It has also been used as a cider ‘sharp’ or ‘bittersharp’. At the 1883 National Apple Congress it was rated as one of the twelve best cooking apples. The trees are good and regular croppers. Pollination Group 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EDELBORSDORFER The early written history of this apple is of Borsdorfer, which, according to Bunyard, goes back to 1561. Borsdorf is in Germany. It was Bunyard who first suggested that Edelborsdorfer was a synonym of Borsdorfer. All early writers wrote of Borsdorfer, and the name Edelborsdorfer only came to prominence in the 20th century. The prefix ‘Edel’ in German means something greater or more noble and we suspect it was a more recently introduced apple than Borsdorfer, which we also have and which appears to be slightly different. We therefore avoid the early history when talking about Edelborsdorfer. This is an excellent apple, sweet and not as crisp as some but nevertheless rich and tender, with white flesh. It is ripe here in late September and will keep its moisture and flavour with careful storage, to the end of the year if the weather is not too mild.

Pollination Group 6

 

 

EDEN Raised by E. J. Ingelby of Forest & Orchard Nurseries at Falfield, in Gloucestershire in 1948 and introduced in 1957 by Matthews of Suffolk. It was confused for some time with Fon's Spring and considered by some to be the same apple, though the truth is that they both arose from the same batch of seeds. Scion wood was provided for us by the Gloucestershire Orchard Group. A mid to late season, well flavoured dessert apple, very handsome in appearance. Medium sized with bright red stripes on the skin, merging to a continuous red. It arose from a cross of John Standish and Cox's Orange Pippin.

Pollination Group 4.