ACID FREE An interesting old domestic apple, kept for its use in jams and preserves. It was brought to us by Janet Bedingfield of Offard Darcy, Cambridgeshire. The tree is quite old and locally it has gone by the name of Acid-Free, being an apple entirely without any acid. The flesh is only sweet and without any great flavour, but its merit would have been in its use for pectin and as an extender in preserves made from stronger tasting fruits. It might also have been used in cider, along with other sharper and more bitter apples. It would have been valued for its long-keeping qualities, staying firm and intact until the Spring.

 
 
 
 
 

 

 

ACKLAM RUSSET From Acklam, near Malton, Yorkshire. Its first known date has been assumed to be 1768, until now but we suspect its origin is before 1750, based on a document at Aldby Park . Small to medium sized, with variable russet over a yellow base, ripe in November and keeping to March with care. Crisp, juicy and richly flavoured. Spur bearing.

 

ADAMS’ PEARMAIN A late dessert apple originally either from Norfolk or Herefordshire, where it was known as the Hanging Pearmain. It became better known in 1826 when the London Horticultural Society, who were preparing a catalogue of fruit, received scions for grafting from Mr Adams. It has a rich, aromatic, nutty taste and a crisp texture when fresh. The fruits are very conical, medium-sized and deep yellow, with red streaks often covering most of the apple, and with some russeting. They store well, and can be kept until March. The trees are said to be vigorous, though we find the vigour modest, with attractive blossom. Part tip-bearing, with upright growth when young but still recommended for espaliers.

Pollination Group 3

 

ALAN’S APPLE A very good old apple discovered by Hilary Wilson of Appleby-in-Westmorland, who sent us scions several years ago. She found it in the garden of Mr Alan Leffley, now in his 90s, of the old village of Hayton in Allerdale, Cumberland. We have jointly named it after him, since it is not a variety now known. It is a dessert apple, medium sized but quite often large, ribbed and with a pretty colouring of strawberry red streaks and blushes, over very pale yellow, almost white. The flesh is very sweet, crisp, juicy and well flavoured. It is ripe in late September or early October and will last until December, in the south, though softening with storage. It is inclined to fruit when young and is spur bearing. A valuable apple for both North and South. Showy deep pink blossom. *

Pollination Group 5

 

 

 

ALDWICK BEAUTY From Aldwick, Sussex, originating with Mrs D.M. Alford. An early and attractive dessert apple, ripe in August. Small to medium sized, round and flattened in shape, boldly striped and flushed with glowing crimson. Richly flavoured in warm summers. It was sent to the National Collection in the late 20th century.

Pollination Group 6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
             

 

ALEXANDER Originally called Aport and probably from the Ukraine. It was renamed Alexander when introduced to England in 1805 by the nurseryman James Lee. It was sent to Massachusetts before 1817. Alexander has been widely grown all over Northern Europe. It is a large, or very large, apple and Hogg recounts that one exhibited by James Lee was 5½” in diameter and weighed 19ozs. A showy apple of lemon yellow, with red streaks on the shaded side, but orange, flushed bright red on the side next to the sun. It was a popular Victorian exhibition variety. A useful mid-season cooking apple, which cooks to a sweetish, scented purée, and is also a pleasant dessert apple. The cream flesh is crisp, juicy and aromatic. A vigorous tree, with good crops, which was often used for espaliers as the fruit was so attractive

Pollination Group 4

 

 

ALFRISTON A large cooking apple with cream, crisp flesh, sweet and sharp early in the season and mellowing with age. The skin is greenish-yellow in the shade, tinted orange to brown next to the sun, and sometimes covered with veins of russet. Very popular in the nineteenth century, when it was known as one of the best cooking apples. It was bred by Mr Shepherd of Uckfield, Sussex, in the late eighteenth century, and was originally known as Shepherd’s Pippin, but was renamed Alfriston in the late nineteenth century. It stores well, and was once popular with sailors on long voyages. It keeps its shape fully, to the point of being quite firm, and has a good tang and a rich but subtle flavour. It welcomes a little sugar added. Vigorous trees, with good crops. Pretty pale blossom.

Pollination Group 3

 

 

 

ALLEN'S EVERLASTING An Irish apple, probably introduced by Thomas Rivers in the mid nineteenth century. Once known as one of the best late dessert apples; rough skinned, but crisp, juicy and intensely flavoured. Good for cordon or espalier training, as it readily forms fruiting spurs, but as a standard the habit is rather compact. It will store as late as June. Hogg says it was also a good culinary apple, though the size is modest. Dwarf habit and attractive dark blossom buds.

Pollination Group 4

 

 

 

 

 

 
             

 

ALLINGTON PIPPIN It was raised in south Lincolnshire by 1884 by Thomas Laxton, as Brown’s South Lincoln Beauty and introduced by Bunyard’s Nurseries in 1896 under the current name. This dessert apple is a cross between Cox’s Orange Pippin and King of the Pippins, so it has a rich aromatic flavour and crunchy texture. The attractively striped fruit is of medium size and will also cook well, keeping its shape. Fruit is ready at the end of October and can be stored for a month. The crop is heavy, but can be biennial, unless thinned.

Pollination Group 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ALVEDISTON A new name for a very old tree, owned by Victoria Spendlove at Alvediston, near Salisbury, Wiltshire. The appearance of the tree would suggest it was planted in the early or middle 19th century. It is now 76 inches around and was mature in the 1950s when the previous owner was a child there. It was the only tree in the garden. The property was built in the mid 18th century, attached to a large farm, and the tree is a likely sole survivor of the farm orchard. The apples are long and oval to conical, with apple green skin turning yellow and often developing a rosy cheek when ripe from mid-October. By early November the apples are pleasant to eat with a fruity, sweet flavour, but its primary use is for cooking, when it softens quickly, but keeps its shape. The flavour is rich, lemony and only mildly acid; sweet enough without adding sugar. The apples can be stored into January. It is a mystery why there were so few Wiltshire apples recorded and so few still known with their names still connected. We are grateful to Victoria for her help with photos, apple parcels and scionwood in 2013 and Wiltshire now has another excellent apple to its name.

 

 

 

 

 

 

AMERICAN GOLDEN RUSSET Of unknown origin but with a long history in America and first mentioned by Coxe in 1817 as Bullock’s Pippin. Downing renamed it in 1845. It is said to have originated in Burlington County, New Jersey. It was in Britain, in the first catalogue of the London Horticultural Society in 1826. Hogg described it as a late dessert apple, lasting to January and the size of Golden Harvey (small). The shape is roundish ovate, but it can be tall. Regular in outline. Yellow skin with patches of pale brown or ashen grey russet. The skin is tough and the flesh yellowish, tender and fine, juicy, rich and aromatic. Scott says it resembles in texture a fine buttery pear, valued for high flavour and great produce. In use from October to January and also once used as a cider ‘sweet’. Still grown in America.

Pollination Group 5

 

 

 
 

 

         

 

AMERICAN SUMMER PEARMAIN Predating 1817, when it was described by Coxe in America. By 1826 it had entered the collection of London Horticultural Society, at Chiswick. Hogg, in 1884, described it as medium sized, oblong, regular and handsome. The skin is yellow with patches and streaks of pale red, with brighter red near the sun. The flesh is yellow, tender, rich and pleasantly flavoured. He adds it is an excellent early apple for dessert or culinary purposes, ripe at the end of August and keeping to the end of September. A good bearer and good on light soils. Scott says that it is reckoned to be a seedling from the ‘English’ Summer Pearmain. He calls it ‘rich and highly esteemed in America’. The American pomologist Downing also suggests it arose from the ‘English’ Summer Pearmain.

Pollination Group 3

 

ANANAS REINETTE Syn. Pineapple Reinette. Thought to be from Holland, though mentioned by many European writers in the nineteenth century and widely grown. It was brought to England, from Metz, by Scott before 1872. The name was often anglicized to Pineapple Reinette. The fruit is small and oblong in shape, with golden yellow skin and russet markings. It is crisp, sweet and juicy, with agreeable acid, and by November has a distinct and refreshing pineapple flavour. Can be used for dessert or cooking, when it keeps its shape. Good crops. Stores until January.

Pollination Group 4

 

 

 

ANNIE ELIZABETH Also called Carter’s Seedling or The George. A late culinary apple, introduced by an amateur grower called Samuel Greatorex, of Knighton, Leicestershire, in 1857 and named after his daughter who died at 13 months. The large, sweet fruits keep their shape when cooked and need very little sugar. They will keep until April. The trees were once popular in ornamental orchards because of their striking deep pink and maroon blossom. George Bunyard and Owen Thomas (1904 The Fruit Garden) reported that the tree would keep hold of its fruit in windy weather. Free spurring and trees fruit when quite young.

Pollination Group 5